Carillon, carry on

Carillon, carry on

In my last French lesson, I told my teacher that Chris and I recently climbed up the bell tower in Lille and asked her to help me pronounce the word in French, le beffroi. It sounded weird to me, as does the actual English translation, belfry. Before coming here, I don't think I'd ever even seen the word belfry. You don't find them that often in the U.S., but you can't miss them in this neck of the woods.  

She talked about how belfries are typical here, as are les carillons (sets of bells). Having checked out this blog, she pointed out that carillon is pronounced like "carry on," which really struck a chord with me. Or...rung a bell. 

I love how when played together, the bells of le carillon fill the city with a familiar song. The chimes don't last long, but when you hear them again it's what I imagine a fond memory sounds like. 

   La place du Général-de-Gaulle, Lille.

La place du Général-de-Gaulle, Lille.

Learning a new language is difficult, as is landing in a new city and trying to figure out a new culture, but I'm also finding new ways to translate, see, and experience the world. That's why I love traveling. 

Lille has been the perfect home for our first 6 weeks in Europe. With only one day left here, I'm going to keep working on my French pronunciation and put the sounds of les carillons in my carry on.

Images: Chambre de commerce et son beffroi (L), Le beffroi de l'Hôtel de ville de Lille (R).

Baltic cruise - Warnemünde & Rostock

Baltic cruise - Warnemünde & Rostock

Amsterdam

Amsterdam